SEAALL 2011


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2011 SEAALL Annual Meeting Final Program

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

3:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Registration open

Thursday, April 14, 2011

8:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. Registration open
9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. SEAALL Institute (Carolina Wren)
3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Exhibits open
3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Tour of the South Carolina Supreme Court Library
Bus loading in front of hotel.
4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. SEAALL Executive Board Meeting - Carolina Board Room
6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. Opening reception at the Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center

Friday, April 15, 2011

8:00 a.m. - 5:00 a.m. Registration open
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Exhibits open

7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. Breakfast & SEAALL Business Meeting (Palmetto Ballroom)

9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. Programs A1, A2, A3

A-1 Designing and Preserving Special Collections (Yellow Jasmine)

Speakers:
Suzanne R. Graham, University of Georgia School of Law Library
Sharon Bradley, University of Georgia School of Law Library

Program Description: Our collections' unique holdings can make the greatest impact to scholarship, and yet our special collections often suffer from a lack of staff expertise to preserve and describe unusual formats. An experienced special collections cataloger and a special collections librarian will share the basics of standards-based cataloging and preservation of these formats. Program will include hands-on practice with creating a metadata record for a manuscript and a photograph collection (with attention paid to perceived impact of RDA).

Program Handouts:
Graham, MARC Template
Graham, Summary Information

A-2 Passing the Baton: Option or Obligation? (Carolina Wren)

Moderator: Ajaye Bloomstone, Acquisitions/DOCLINE Librarian, LSU Law Center Library

Speakers:
Jean Holcomb - Speaker, King County Law Library (Library Director, retired)
Carol Avery Nicholson - Speaker, Associate Director for Technical Services, UNC-Chapel Hill, Katherine R. Everett Law Library

Coordinators:
Ajaye Bloomstone, Acquisitions/DOCLINE Librarian, LSU Law Center Library Ismael Gullon, Associate Law Librarian for Collections and Technical Services, Furman Smith Law Library, Mercer University

Program Description: As the professional librarian population ages, new members must be recruited, hired, and trained to manage our departments and operations. Regardless of their titles, or how what they do may have changed over the years, this program will focus on concerns, issues, and implementation plans as law librarians retire and "pass the baton" to newer law library professionals. How do we recruit and train others to take over for us? What historical information do we impart about our institutions and departments so that the library can continue to be responsive to its ever-changing patron community? Our first speaker will address succession planning in law libraries to help guide librarians and staff through inevitable transitions, and our second speaker will present a "case study" touching on aspects of succession planning in a particular library. The program will conclude with an interactive discussion among presenters and attendees.

Program Handouts:
Holcomb, Succession Planning: The Institution's Perspective
Nicholson, Are you Ready for the Rest of Life? Tips for Successful Transitions

A-3 Collaborating for Success: the Authentication and Preservation of Digital Legal Information (Breakout I & II)

Speakers:
Timothy L. Coggins, Associate Dean for Library & Information Services and Professor of Law, University of Richmond School of Law
Anne E. Burnett, Foreign & International Law Librarian, University of Georgia

Program Description: State governments are increasingly moving to digital only versions of their statutes, cases, regulations, and other government information, but most are not taking necessary steps to ensure the trustworthiness, the authenticity, and the preservation of this information. AALL and others are collaborating to draw attention to and help solve these issues. A few states, including some in the Southeast, are leading the way. Join two members of the American Association of Law Libraries' Electronic Legal Information Access and Citation Committee for an update and a discussion of these issues. They will highlight some exciting developments, including the drafting of "Authentication and Preservation of State Electronic Legal Materials Act" by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws, which is based on many AALL efforts and information from AALL's National Summit on Digital Legal Information. The speakers also will discuss how law librarians can get involved in this work, including the development of a national legal inventory of state primary legal resources and how you might help with the adoption of the NCCUSL uniform law by your state's legislature.

Program Handouts:
Burnett & Coggins, Collaborating for Success
Burnett & Coggins, Authentication Program
Burnett & Coggins, Authentication Report
Burnett & Coggins, Authentication Help

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m. Exhibit Break

10:15 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Plenary Session: Moderated Discussion - Future of Legal Publishing (Palmetto Ballroom)

Moderator: Duncan Alford, Associate Dean and Director of the Law Library, University of South Carolina School of Law

Speakers:
Scott Collins, Vice President of Lexis Law Schools
Steve Newsom, Managing Director, Lawriter LLC
Dinyar Mehta, Director, WestlawNext

11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. SEAALL Luncheon - Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center
1:15 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Exhibits open

1:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m. Programs B1, B2, B3

B-1 Embrace Creative Conflict: Encourage the Healthy Aspects of Conflict to Reach Better Decisions in the Workplace (Yellow Jasmine)

Speakers:
Maureen Cahill, Student Services Librarian, University of Georgia School of Law Library
James Donovan, Director and Associate Professor of Law, University of Kentucky Law Library

Program Description: The most innovative organizations have moved beyond merely managing conflict. They have learned to actually encourage healthy conflict and harness the creative energy it sparks. Using this "creative contention", organizations hammer out superior solutions to the problems they confront. The decision making participants forge closer bonds with one another. And, these groups implement decisions or new programs more easily because most participants become change agents during the decision making process.

In the years since the University of Georgia Law Library transitioned to a team based structure, its primary decision making body, the Steering Group, has grown into this model of decision making. Listen and learn as two long time participants share important milestones in that growth and explain the processes and skills that are necessary to make creative contention a viable tool.

Program Handouts:
Cahill, Embrace Creative Conflict: Encourage the Healthy Aspects of Conflict to Reach Better Decisions in the Workplace

B-2 The New Model Library: Building an All Digital Academic Library (Breakout I & II)

Speakers:
Gordon Russell, Associate Dean and Director of the Law Library, Lincoln Memorial University
Katherine Marsh, Faculty Services Librarian, Lincoln Memorial University
Joshua Pluta, Emerging Technologies Librarian, Lincoln Memorial University
David Walker, Information Services Librarian, Lincoln Memorial University
Ann Walsh Long, Technical Services/Circulation Librarian, Lincoln Memorial University

Program Description: The library staff from Lincoln Memorial University Duncan School of Law has been working for the last two years to build a primarily digital law school library, and would like to share the successes and challenges of the process with our colleagues. This program will consist of two portions. The first portion will be a series of 5 Ignite-style presentations, with each of our five librarians speaking to an aspect of the daily functions: administration; faculty relations; reference; technology; and technical services. These presentations will feature some opportunities for audience interaction using polling devices and software. The second portion will be a panel discussion, with questions from the audience.

B-3 Poster Sessions (Carolina Wren)

(a) Finding the Next Job: Using the AALL Career Center

Speakers:
Kate Irwin-Smiler, Reference Librarian, Wake Forest University School of Law
Kate McLeod, Associate Dean for Library and Information Services, Elon University School of Law

Program Description: The program will provide a general overview of the job searching process, highlighting the new AALL Career Center and its use in the job search process.

(b) Less is More: Programming Efforts That Won't Drive You Crazy

Speakers:
Maureen Cahill, University of Georgia School of Law Library
Sharon Bradley, University of Georgia School of Law Library

Program Description: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe is credited with the aphorism "less is more." He was talking about architecture. For library public relations and outreach activities the sentiment is absolutely true. The librarians at the University of Georgia School of Law have discovered the secret to planning programs that impose a minimum of stress on the library staff, yet still achieve high attendance and lasting good will. Part of their secret is listening well to feedback from students. Programs as varied as a lunch 'n learn series (pizza and a 30 minute instruction session) to a case book repair clinic require minimum of planning, and just as importantly, offer a clear benefit to students while eating up very little of their time.

Program Handouts:
Bradley, Less is More: Programming Efforts That Won't Drive You Crazy

(c) Select Once? Get Books Forever!

Speaker:
Wendy E. Moore, Acquisitions Librarian, University of Georgia Law Library

Program Description: Who doesn't want to save both time and money? Streamline collection development decision making by receiving books automatically, in addition to slips, as part of a book vendor approval plan. This poster session will look at the pros and cons of automatic book delivery as part of an approval plan. There will be information on how to set up automatic book delivery, using YBP as an example, to suit your library's collection development needs. COSELL, of which many SEAALL libraries are members, has a consortia discount with YBP, which is why they were selected to use as an example.

(d) Our Students Are Mobile. We Are Too! Using Webinars for Database Instruction

Speakers:
Alyssa Folse, Reference Librarian, Stetson University College of Law
Wanita Scroggs, Reference Librarian, Stetson University College of Law
Robert Brammer, Reference Librarian, Stetson University College of Law

Program Description: In spring semester 2010, Stetson University College of Law reference librarians, as part of the Research & Writing Library Liaison program, began offering LexisNexis and Westlaw training for 1L students using Microsoft Live Meeting. This poster presentation will focus on the advantages and disadvantages of offering database trainings via webinar. This poster presentation will also offer some helpful tips as well as pitfalls to avoid when planning online training sessions.

2:15 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Exhibit Break

2:30 p.m. - 3:15 p.m. Programs C1, C2, C3

C-1 Designing and Delivering a Successful CLE Program (Breakout I & II)

Speakers:
Mary Miller, Assistant Dean for Information, Technology & Legal Research, Mississippi College School of Law
Brian Barnes, Deputy Law Library Director and Assistant Professor, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law
Thomas Walter, Reference/Computer Services Librarian, Mississippi College School of Law

Program Description: Law librarians as information specialists, teachers, and those who sit on the edge of new technologies can serve as the confluence of providing emerging information and technology when teaching CLEs for attorneys. The speakers will discuss how to create, collaborate, and then communicate to execute a CLE program that educates the legal profession and raises the profile of your library.

Based upon the experiences of three law school librarians who have all taught CLEs to attorneys and paralegals, attendees will learn how to: Coordinate with an existing CLE provider; Design a program which will benefit both experienced and inexperienced attendees; Utilize the strengths of each presenter; and Create techniques which allow attendees to interact with the presenter and with each other. The presenters will also discuss the future of CLEs and new opportunities for librarians given ever-evolving technology.

C-2 "The Witness That Testifies to the Passing of Time:" The Value of Including Works of History in the Law Collection (Yellow Jasmine)

Speaker: Beau Steenken, Reference Librarian, University of Kentucky College of Law Library

Program Description: Cicero (whom the title of the program quotes) notes that history "illumines reality, vitalizes memory, provides guidance in daily life and brings us tidings of antiquity." Law accomplishes many of the same. The program will note the common derivation of history and law and describe the relationship of the two fields. It will then briefly delve into specific areas of legal study that benefit the most from an understanding of history, most notably constitutional/legislative interpretation (in which concepts of original intent and original meaning are often brought to bear) and public international law (in which the actions and practices of states serve as primary sources of law). Finally, the program will explore how collaboration between historians and legal scholars, both passively through collection development and actively through special projects, would not only strengthen lawyers' understanding of the historical foundations of the law but also lead to the creation of new forms of history that would benefit each field.

C-3 Hands on Poster Session: Taking the Law Into Your Own Hands: Encouraging eBook Readers at the Library (Carolina Wren)

Speakers:
Pam Brannon, Faculty Services Librarian, Georgia State University College of Law Library
Meg Butler, Associate Director for Public Services, Georgia State University College of Law Library
Terrance Manion, Director of Information Technology and Librarian, Georgia State University College of Law Library
Deborah Schander, Reference/Student Services Librarian, Georgia State University College of Law Library
Austin Williams, Reference/Student Services Librarian, Georgia State University College of Law Library

Moderator:
Nancy P. Johnson, Associate Dean for Library and Information Services, Georgia State University College of Law Library

Program Description: This poster session will highlight a range of eBook readers (Kindle, nook, Sony, and various Apple and Android products). Presenters will demonstrate and discuss each eReader's performance in several areas, including: availability of legal resources; compatibility with major legal publishers; ease of use and creating educational programs and resources about eBook readers for law students and faculty. Participants will be able to see each eReader in action and ask questions.

Program Handouts:
Schander, Taking the Law Into Your Own Hands

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 2012 Local Arrangements Committee (Governor's Board Room)
3:15 p.m. - 5:15 p.m. Library tour (Hollings Library, USC)
Bus loading in front of hotel.
4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. COSELL Board meeting (Carolina Board Room)
6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Friday Cocktail Reception - Meridian Building Rooftop
Bus loading in front of hotel.

Saturday, April 16, 2011

8:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Exhibits open
8:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. Registration open
9:00 a.m. - 9:45 a.m. Plenary Speaker - Melanie Huggins (Executive Director, Richland County Public Library) (Palmetto Ballroom)

10:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. Programs D1, D2, D3

D-1 Moving from the Classroom to the Web: What To Do Differently When We Never Do This Again (Breakout I & II)

Speakers:
Patricia Morgan, Faculty Research Services Reference Librarian, University of Florida
Elizabeth Outler, Head of Public Services & Tax Law Librarian, University of Florida

Program Description: Teaching online has become a popular idea with administrators, teachers, and students. There are many good reasons to offer online education alternatives, particularly in law schools, where much of the student body may be working or traveling during summers, but often at other times during the academic year as well. Law firm librarians may also be developing online training programs for new associates and for continuing education, as firms geographically spread out and library staffs continue to shrink. The goal of this program is to help teaching librarians have realistic expectations about the process of preparing and teaching a class online. Patricia Morgan and Elizabeth Outler will share their story of moving their Advanced Legal Research course from a classroom to the web in summer 2010. The program will be delivered with humor, looking back at the total failure of their first online teaching experience, and sharing lessons learned for "when we never do this again." The biggest lesson learned is that online classes do not take less time to plan, to teach, or to evaluate - they take more time at every step along the way.

D-2 Assisted Employment: Add Diversity to your Work Place and Learn Along the Way (Carolina Wren)

Speaker: Maureen Cahill, University of Georgia School of Law Library

Program Description: Assisted employment services empower developmentally, emotionally or physically disabled individuals to maximize their potential and be successful in the workplace. By participating in an assisted employment program, your library can diversify its workforce, help an individual assimilate into the world of work, and teach every member of your staff both the importance of meaningful work and the richness of human ability.

In this session, participants will learn the basic structure of supported employment and hear about the experience of the University of Georgia Law Library, where an individual with assisted employment services has worked for over five years.

Program Handouts:
Cahill, Assisted Employment: Add Diversity to your Work Place and Learn Along the Way

D-3 Ignite Presentations (Yellow Jasmine)

(a) Law Library Lessons from the Godfather Trilogy

Speaker: Brian Barnes, Deputy Law Library Director, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law

Program Description: This Ignite presentation talk will reflect lessons for law librarians that can be learned from the Mario Puzo written classic movies which have won numerous Academy Awards. Lesson will include management techniques, growing your influence, and other helpful tips from Corleone family.

(b) Why is Ally McBeal behind our Circ Desk?

Speaker: Bronwyn Main, Technical Services Assistant, Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center; Master's in Library and Information Studies student, Florida State University

Program Description: The Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center recently buffed its popular DVD collection that is available to students, faculty and staff. This includes both law related titles like 'Ally McBeal' and 'Law and Order' as well as titles like 'Avatar' and 'Sopranos.' This decision was based on the previous implementation of similar collections at the University of Texas' Tarlton Law Library and William & Mary's Wolf Law Library. This short presentation is intended to make you laugh, but hopefully will encourage you to seriously consider a similar collection development plan at your law library.

Program Handouts:
Main, Why is Ally McBeal behind our Circ Desk?

(c) Partnering with Student Journals for Delivery of Library Services

Speakers:
Rebekah Maxwell, Associate Director for Library Operations, Coleman Karesh Law Library
Katie Danner Holtz, Access Services Assistant, Coleman Karesh Law Library

Program Description: This Ignite presentation will describe how our library developed an outreach program to streamline services to journals, featuring a training module for research/articles editors that facilitates accurate and cost-effective use of our library materials and interlibrary loan system.

(d) NCSTL.org: Forensic Library Without Walls

Speakers:
Diana Botluk, Director of Research, National Clearinghouse for Science, Technology and the Law at Stetson University College of Law
Ellen Mizio, NCSTL Fellow, National Clearinghouse for Science, Technology and the Law at Stetson University College of Law

Program Description: The National Clearinghouse for Science, Technology and the Law offers an online resource for anyone seeking information about forensic science, scientific evidence, and expert witnesses. This website and award-winning database of 100,000+ records (www.ncstl.org) is free and open to everyone.

Whether your patron is a law enforcement professional looking for information on voice analysis, a lawyer preparing a forensic anthropologist for trial, a professor preparing for a class on scientific evidence, or a student writing a paper on the CSI effect, NCSTL.org's resources can help.

Program Handouts:
Mizio, NCSTL.org: Forensic Library Without Walls

(e) Democratizing the Law: Pinch me, I'm dreaming!

Speaker: Philip Rosenthal, Ph.D., Esq., President, Fastcase, Inc.

Program Description: Could we be on the verge of a world where the law is free? The Law.gov movement promises to make all U.S. primary law free. Bar associations are providing free legal research to over 900,000 lawyers. Then add Google Scholar. Where is this going? What does it all mean to librarians and the firms and schools they serve?

Program Handouts:
Fastcase, Handout

(f) Advocating Adoption of Creative Commons Content

Speaker: Roger Skalbeck, Associate Law Librarian for Electronic Resources & Services, Georgetown University School of Law, Chair of the AALL Copyright Committee

Program Description: Creative Commons is an open licensing system that allows you to choose how others can use your works without requiring permission in many circumstances. It's a great way to reduce transaction costs for reuse and get you and your library noticed. Also, it creates potential for your works to be adopted, adapted and noticed. Most law librarians like the idea in theory, but few libraries have embraced Creative Commons for their materials. In this Ignite talk, I highlight the benefits of creative commons adoption, while addressing potential concerns, such as freeriding and uncompensated commercial use.

10:45 a.m. - 11:15 a.m. Exhibit break

11:15 a.m. - 12 Noon Programs E1, E2, E3

E-1 Dongles, Ripping, and Jailbreaking, Oh My! The DMCA Exceptions and Libraries (Carolina Wren)

Speakers:
Jennifer Wondracek, Instructional Services Reference Librarian, University of Florida, Levin College of Law, Member of the AALL Copyright Committee
Roger Skalbeck, Associate Law Librarian for Electronic Resources & Services, Georgetown University School of Law, Chair of the AALL Copyright Committee

Program Description: The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) contains a provision that forbids circumventing technological protections, but gives the Librarian of Congress the ability to create exemptions. This program will explore the new set of six exemptions (valid until 2012), and the speakers will discuss their implications for libraries and their patrons. Attendees will be expected to possess a basic understanding of copyright law and be ready to delve into the intricacies of anti-circumvention issues.

Program Handouts:
Skalbeck, Dongles, Ripping, and Jailbreaking, Oh My! The DMCA Exceptions and Libraries

E-2 Main Libraries and Law Libraries: Communicate, Collaborate, and Create a Cross Campus Collection (Breakout I & II)

Moderator: Pamela Rogers Melton, Associate Director for Library Administration, Coleman Karesh Law Library, University of South Carolina

Speakers:
Gary Geer, Collection Development Librarian, Thomas Cooper Library, University of South Carolina
Edward T. Hart, Head of Technical Services, Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center, University of Florida

Program Description: Cross campus collection development is an effort that is often paid lip service, but honestly, could you pick your collection development or acquisitions counterparts from across campus out of a crowd? Cooperation between the main library and the law library can save both sides money, and perhaps more importantly, broaden access to interdisciplinary resources for all scholars and students. The speakers will address the benefits and challenges of this cooperation on their different campuses and evaluate the partnership from their perspectives. Examples to be discussed will include coordinating electronic subscriptions, splitting subscriptions, and developing a dovetailed book approval plan.

E-3 Preparing Strong Research Guides (Yellow Jasmine)

Speakers:
Sara Sampson, Head of Reference, Georgetown University Law Library
Catherine M. Dunn, Reference Librarian, Georgetown University Law Library
Morgan Stoddard, Reference Librarian, Georgetown University Law Library

Program Description: The advent of online technologies has led to an explosion of available research resources, making the efforts of librarians to direct users to the best sources more critical than ever. One of the ways the reference staff at the Georgetown University Law Library works to meet this need is by creating and updating online research guides for its users. This session will cover Georgetown's process for preparing these guides, including the initial decision to create a guide in a particular area or of a particular type, the steps taken in putting it together, and the way the library markets its use once complete. The speakers will also present some general best practices for libraries looking to create strong research guides for their patrons.

Program Handouts:
Dunn, Research Guide Style Manual

End of Conference.